Developing an Emergency Action Plan

Developing an Emergency Action Plan

Whenever going into the great outdoors with a troop, it’s important to develop an Emergency Action Plan, or EAP.  An effective EAP must be simple, easy to remember, and in writing.  Y0u should make an EAP clear for all girls, volunteers, and event staff to understand.  A EAP should include these general features:

  • How the person who recognizes the emergency is to signal others.
  • The steps each person should take in an emergency.
  • The location of rescue and safety equipment.
  • Actions to minimize the emergency and safely rescue any victims.
  • How to call for medical assistance when needed.
  • Follow up procedures for after the emergency.

All adults should be briefed in detail what to do in case of an emergency with the troop.  Depending on the age of the girls, you can brief them at the same time if they’re older and can understand the details, or you may choose to brief younger girls separately using language they can more easily understand.

When you put your EAP into writing, consider including any of the applicable following sections:

  • Layout of facility/environment.
    • EMS personnel access and entry/exit routes.
    • Location of rescue and first aid equipment.
    • Location of telephones, with emergency telephone numbers posted.
    • Location of keys for buildings or rooms with telephones or emergency equipment.
    • Exits and evacuation routes.
  • Equipment available.
    • Rescue equipment.
    • First aid supplies.
    • Emergency equipment, such as flashlights or fire extinguishers.
  • Support personnel available.
    • Internal.
      • Staff members.
      • Troop leaders.
      • Volunteers.
      • Clerical personnel.
      • Maintenance personnel.
    • External.
      • EMS personnel.
      • Police officers.
      • Fire fighters.
      • Hazardous materials (HazMat) team.
      • Poison control center.
      • Hospitals.
      • Power and gas companies.
      • Health department.
      • Search and rescue team.
  • Staff responsibilities.
    • Assign each adult a duty:
      • Provide care.
      • Control bystanders and troop.
      • Meet EMS personnel.
      • Interview witnesses.
  • Communications.
    • How and when to call 9-1-1 (or other local emergency number), and who will make the call.
    • Chain of command.
    • Personal to contact family/parents.
    • Person to deal with media.
  • Follow up.
    • This includes items such as EAP documentation and evaluation.

Clearly, some of these sections do not need to be included for a day trip to a public, controlled area (such as a pool or water park).  They should all be included when taking an extended trip or a trip to a more remote area, like a day hike or weekend long camping trip.

For more, read Basic Water Rescue, a booklet published by the American Red Cross.

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Wall Names

Wall Names

I love this project because the things you can do with it go beyond personalizing a room!  I always wanted to make wall names for my room, but sharing it with my brother and not wanting to make one for him too, that was an idea quickly squashed!  Kids, especially creative girls, love to put a personal touch on things.  With the permission of the parents, this is a great project for girls to help decorate their bedrooms or playrooms.  I suggest 7″ letters as they seem to be the most widely available, however you can use whatever size letters you want to make the project more feasible for your troop.  Since the wooden letters are the most customized of all the supplies, you can also request that the girl’s supply the letters – they can do their names, or words!

Want to share photos of your troop and finished projects? Contact Us!

Materials NeededMaterials Needed:

DirectionsDirections:

  1. Remember, first, to allow the paint to dry between each step.
  2. Lay down the newspapers to protect your work area.  Paint edges all around the letters.
  3. Plan out what patterns of paper should be used for each letter.  Apply the glue stick to the front of the letter and smooth over the paper, removing any air pockets or wrinkles.  Turn the letter paper side down onto the cutting mat.  Have an adult use the craft knife to cut away the excess paper around the letters.
  4. You can also use the letters and trace out the shape onto the back side of the paper with a pencil and cut out the letters with scissors, then glue the paper onto the letters.
  5. Use outward strokes to sand the edges of the letters.  This will create a slightly distressed look and secures the paper to the letters.
  6. Use tacky glue to attach felt flowers or other embellishments of choice to the letters.  For a finishing touch, spray glitter spray over the entire letter.

Safety TipsSafety Tips!

  1. Craft knife should only be used by adults, or with adult supervision for older girls.
  2. Use glitter spray only outside or in a well-ventilated area.
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Alice the Camel

Alice the Camel

This is a fun song.  The way we sang it, there was a pause just before the number of humps, and we’d always shake our hips for each “bump”.  It’s a simple counting song, as well as involves some movement.  I’ve also seen it sung very similarly to My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean where the girls are standing for most of the song, but bend down at the knees during the number.  There’s also a variation where the girls hold up one hand with the corresponding fingers showing for the number of humps.

Alice’s camel has five humps
Alice’s camel has five humps
Alice’s camel has five humps
So go, Alice, go!
Bump bump bump bump.

(Repeat the chorus with 1 fewer humps each time until…)

Alice’s camel has no humps
Alice’s camel has no humps
Alice’s camel has no humps
So Alice’s camel is a horse (of course!)

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