Tag Archives: food coloring

Flubber

Flubber

This is a super simple craft that younger girls can have a blast with.  It can get messy, so be sure to keep craft clothes or smocks on hand.  Old adult button down long sleeve shirts work well to protect little girls clothes from the mess.

Materials NeededMaterials Needed:

  • 2 c. White glue
  • Food Coloring
  • 2 tsp. Borax
  • 1 c. Hot Water

DirectionsDirections:

  1. Mix all ingredients together, adding the food coloring slowly to make desired shade.
  2. Pour off excess water.

Safety TipsSafety Tips!

  1. An adult should add the Borax to the mixture to limit the girls’ exposure to the detergent.

A flubber kind of putty will be made from this that the girls can bounce and shape liberally.  It is not ideal for sculpting as it won’t dry out and preserve the shapes.  Be sure to have plastic bags on hand to send the flubber home in.  This can be a fun activity to pair with a viewing of either Flubber or The Absent-Minded Professor on a rainy meeting night.

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Colored Carnations

Colored Carnations

This is a perfect craft around any holiday or any time of year.  The colors you choose to transform the carnations into can be themed to match holidays, events, ceremonies, or seasons.  Darker colors will work best to color the carnations, but any color is worth a try!  It’s simple and creative.  It’s also a great science experiment for younger girls.   This craft can be combined with other crafts, like making a plastic bottle vase or recycled glass vase.

Materials NeededMaterials Needed:

  • White carnations
  • Liquid food coloring
  • Flower vases
  • Water

DirectionsDirections:

  1. Fill vase ¼ of water.
  2. Add about 15 drops of food coloring to the water in the vase (more if the vase is large and the shade looks too light).
  3. Trim about 1″ off of the stems at the bottom at an angular cut.
  4. Put a flower in the vase and let it sit for 24 hours.

Safety TipsSafety Tips!

  1. Always have an adult cut the flower stems.
  2. Use non-toxic food coloring.

The best way to go about this, since it does take about 24 hours for the flowers to change color, is to set up the experiment during the meeting and have the girls take them home.  Tell them to watch them and ask parents to take photos of the flowers the next day.  At the following meeting, the girls can bring their flowers back if they’re still alive or bring in the photos to share their results.

This is a great craft when working on science badges or as a prelude to a scientific outing.  The process of the water moving up the stem into the petals is known as cohesion. The process gets its name because water is considered a very cohesive or sticky substance, which means that water pulled up through the stem takes on a magnetic-like effect, pulling the water up. The tubes in the plant (also known as capillaries) are very small and thin.