Preventing Hypothermia

Posted by Trish | Posted in First Aid, Meeting Activities | Posted on 07-05-2010

Preventing Hypothermia

Hypothermia doesn’t just happen in the winter or in cold water.  Hypothermia can occur in water that’s 70 degrees, so you need to be aware of hypothermia even when enjoying spring and summer water activities.  Know how to protect your troop from hypothermia by:

  • Always wearing a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket while boating on cold water.  A life jacket not only provides flotation, but it also helps the person wearing it to conserve body heat.
  • Wearing layers of insulated clothes that keep you warm even while wet, such as clothing made from wool or containing polypropylene or capilene.
  • Wearing a wet suit or dry suit during aquatic activities.
  • Wearing a hat.  Body heat is quickly lost through the head.

For more, read Basic Water Rescue, a booklet published by the American Red Cross.

Being Prepared for an Aquatic Emergency

Posted by Trish | Posted in First Aid, Meeting Activities | Posted on 30-04-2010

Being Prepared for an Aquatic Emergency

It;s important to be prepared for an aquatic emergency.  Being prepared means being ready before it happens.  To be prepared for an emergency, you must first understand the aquatic environment and review general water safety guidelines.  Always:

  • Be aware of the conditions and potential hazards of the water environment, whether it’s a pool, lake, river, ocean, or other body of water.  Know its unique conditions, as well as hazards common in your geographical area, such as storms, currents, and underwater obstructions.
  • Understand the various recreational activities that are common in your area and their hazards.  Consider the age and ability of participants in those activities.
  • Learn what kind of accidents and injuries have occurred in your water environment.  This knowledge will help you prevent further injuries and prepare for similar aquatic emergencies.

You also need to have the right equipment on hand in case of a water emergency.

  1. Appropriate rescue equipment for a water emergency, such as a ring buoy, throw bag, heaving line, or reaching pole.
  2. Appropriate life jackets for every person that is in, on, or around the water.
  3. A first aid kit.
  4. A means of communication (such as a phone, cellular phone, or two-way radio).
  5. An emergency signaling device, such as an air horn, whistle, strobe light, signal mirror, flare, or chemical light stick.
  6. Extra clothing, blankets, and rain gear.

For more, read Basic Water Rescue, a booklet published by the American Red Cross.

First Aid Kit for Aquatic Activities

Posted by Trish | Posted in First Aid, Meeting Activities | Posted on 16-04-2010

First Aid Kit for Aquatic Activities

Spring and Summer are coming soon, which means all sorts of swimming, boating, and other water-based activities to cool down under the hot sun.  It’s important that every troop have a water safety kit (or two!) with them when playing in, on, or around the water.  This does vary a bit from a traditional first aid kit with some specific items.  For girls of all ages, this can be turned into a fun meeting activity in preparation for a water-based outing in building their own mini kits or assisting in putting together the main troop kits.

To put together smaller, personal water safety kits, buy large packages for the contents in the kit.  Portion out any liquids in smaller, travel size containers.

Case

  • Durable in extreme hot and cold
  • Waterproof
  • Sized for personal or group needs.

Contents

Include the following additional items in delayed-help environments

For more, read Basic Water Rescue, a booklet published by the American Red Cross.

Water Safety Guidelines

Posted by Trish | Posted in First Aid, Meeting Activities | Posted on 08-04-2010

Water Safety Guidelines

I’ve been meaning to post more first aid tips for troops.  These first aid tops are helpful for outings and to teach the girls.  Older girls can practice some of these techniques to learn.

Everyone should follow safe procedures when in, on, or around the water.  The following are general water safety guidelines.  All aged girls should review these guidelines before any water activities, even swimming.

  • Learn to swim.  Learn boating, general first aid, and CPR skills.  Contact your local Red Cross for information about swimming, first aid, and CPR courses.
  • Check with your local Red Cross, the U.S. Coast Guard, state boating officials, and other organizations about boating courses.  Take a course before engaging in any new activities on the water.
  • Know what to do in case of a water emergency.
  • Wear a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket when around water or when boating.
  • Pay attention to local weather conditions and forecasts.
  • Know how to prevent accidents, recognize hazards, and care for injuries.

For more, read Basic Water Rescue, a booklet published by the American Red Cross.